Episode 74 – Fleeing capitalism vs. communism: Why is U.S. treating Haitian refugees differently?

Coast Guard interdicts 50 Haitian migrants
The U.S. Coast Guard has a long history of intercepting Haitian refugees and deporting them. Photo: Coast Guard News

On Sunday, President Joseph R. Biden’s administration began unprecedented mass deportations of Haitians, who have been entering the United States from Mexico. Why are they being treated differently than, say, Cuban refugees, who only have to set foot on U.S. territorial waters to be welcomed to America? Could race be a factor, or is it because Haitians are fleeing capitalism and not communism like Cubans? And why isn’t there outrage from Black leaders in the administration and Congress?

Episode 73: Guinea pig Alpha Condé finally overthrown

Guinea’s President Alpha Condé, 83, under arrest after the Sept. 5 coup.

On Sept. 5, the Guinean military rolled into the Guinean presidential palace, overthrew the government, and arrested President Alpha Condé, who had been in power since 2010. The country is now under the military rule of Col. Mamady Doumbouya. The colonel has promised to hand over power to civilians soon. Will he, or is this another story of an African military dictatorship in the making?

Episode 72: An African perspective on the U.S. fiasco in Afghanistan

Dirty job
“Dirty job” Photo: The U.S. Army ,

In this episode, Nado and Okong’o give their views on the mess their surrogate homeland of the United States has created in Afghanistan, and how it will affect their homeland of birth, Africa.

Among the countries that have agreed to help the U.S. save face — if that’s even possible — is Uganda. How can one of the world’s poorest nations, which already harbors 1.4 million refugees, afford to take more? And what will happen those among the 2,000 Afghan refugees who won’t be approved to relocate to the United States? Could Uganda be setting herself up for getting stuck with someone else’s problem, or is this a smart move by President Yoweri Museveni to get hold of some American dollars?

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Episode 71: Artist explains Haiti beyond superficial coverage of political violence and earthquakes

Haitian American artist, Sophis, says one can’t understand Haiti without going back to 1804, the year of independence.

Haitian American musical artist, Sophis, gives us some straight-talk insights into the historical context mainstream media often avoid when talking about his country of birth.

Haiti is a country with a rich history. It was the first Black nation to liberate itself from European rule, way back in 1804, when a slave revolt defeated Napoleon’s mighty French army and declared independence. That’s right — 80 years before the 1884 Berlin Conference, when European empires sat down and agreed to divide the African continent amongst themselves, Haiti had fought and defeated one of he greatest of them to become independent.

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Episode 68: Meet Wamkanganise naGaadza, Zimbabwean mbira maker, teacher, and cultural ambassador

Salani Wamkanganise naGaadza (center) with his wife Kelly Takunda Orphan playing mbira during a virtual live concert that was organized by the Eastman School of Music at the University of Rochester. Photo: Mosquito Media.

We speak with Salani Wamkanganise naGaadza, and Kelly Takunda Orphan, a husband and wife who are ambassadors of African music and culture. Salani, a Zimbabwean-born virtuoso, doesn’t just make music and teach people how to play mbira; he makes the instruments himself in the San Francisco Bay Area, where he lives.

Since 2017, Salani has performed and recorded with various mbira ensembles and bands. In 2020, UNESCO inscribed the mbira to be on the Representative List of the Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity, and Salani was one of two featured cultural ambassadors during the filming of the project in Zimbabwe.

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Episode 66: This is what is wrong with (South) Africa

Former South African President Jacob Zuma’s jailing for contempt of court has led to riots that have killed 276 people. Photo: GovernmentZA.

In this episode, we look at how the politics of ethnicity holds Africa back. Why are poor Africans willing to kill or die for wealthy corrupt goons like former S. African President Jacob Zuma, whose jailing for contempt of court has led to riots that have killed 276 people? Can we simultaneously fight corruption and support tribal kingpins like Zuma?

Episode 65: Meet the Ghanaian sisters challenging Europe’s dominance in chocolate making

The Addison sisters, founders of Ghana’s pioneer bean-to-bar company ’57 Chocolate, enjoying their treats. Photo: 57chocolategh.com

We speak with the Addison sisters, Kimberly and Priscilla, who set out to challenge the stereotypical belief that premium chocolate can only be made in Europe. Five years ago, they founded ’57 Chocolate, a pioneer bean-to-bar chocolate company that uses beans grown within Ghana to create delicious treats.

Episode 64: White man raises $1 million by insulting Kenyans and their food

File:Fried Tilapia, Ugali, Sukuma Wiki and Kachumbari (From Kisumu).JPG
Ugali, with fried tilapia, sukuma wiki and kachumbari is a Kenyan delicacy, but don’t tell that to a Frenchman named Robin Reecht. Photo by Napendakukula.

We look at how Robin Reecht, a white Frenchman –who after being in Kenya for only three days–managed to come up with a start-up idea that raised $1 million to improve Kenya’s “not-so-good quality” food. Why is it so easy for white people who know nothing about Africa to raise millions in capital to start businesses in the continent?

In this episode, we also honor one of the most iconic patriarchs of post-colonial Africa, Kenneth Kaunda, the first president of Zambia, who died on June 17 at the age of 97.