A New Year!

Happy New Year to you, our fellow Africa Straight Talk fans! We are thankful that you have supported us over the years!

We are on a short break BUT lookout for our first episode in February.

If you hear or know anyone making waves (small and big) in Africa, email us africastraighttalk@gmail.com. We want to highlight their greatness.

See you soon!

Episode 111: World Cup, weddings, and African dictators

In our last episode of the year, we wind up our coverage of the World Cup and get back to the business of talking about Africa. Are extravagant weddings necessary? Why do African leaders rush to Washington at the snap of President Joe Biden’s fingers?

After this episode, we’re taking a well-deserved month-long break. Once again, thank you so much for supporting Africa Straight Talk. We wish you a very merry and safe holiday season.

Episode 107: How to circumvent Uganda’s draconian social media law

President Yoweri Museveni, who has ruled Uganda since 1986, probably thinks banning free speech will allow him to stay in power for another 40 years. We think Ugandans should just send their seditious thoughts to their allies outside the country and we’ll share them on social media.

And speaking of Twitter, it looks like even Museveni’s son, Gen. Muhoozi Kainerugaba, is tired of waiting for his father to relinquish power. Now, the bored prince recently got in trouble for sending a tweet threatening an unprovoked attack on Kenya’s capital, Nairobi. His father punished him with a promotion.

Episode 105: Queen Elizabeth’s empire did what?

Hana Njau-Okolo, a Kenyan-Tanzanian writer and poet based in Atlanta, Georgia, talks about how a simple conversation with a friend converted her from being an admirer of Queen Elizabeth II to asking tough questions about the departed monarch’s legacy.

Njau-Okolo’s work has been published in the African Roar, an anthology series out of South Africa. Her poem, Kilimanjaro, appeared in Silver Birch Press, a publisher based in California, and she is working on her memoir. She works as a legal assistant with a top law firm in Atlanta, where she is responsible for coordinating the firm’s community service programs. 

Njau-Okolo graduated from City University of New York with a BA in Communications and a minor in French. From 1976 to 1981, she attended Kenya High School, a prestigious institution that was at one time known as European Girls Secondary School, or as her father used to call it, the Queen Elizabeth School for Girls.

Episode 104: Sleepless in Ghana

Kwesi Wilson returns to the show to talk about the proliferation of evangelical churches in his country of birth, Ghana, and how their around-the-clock “speaking in tongues” ruined what was supposed to be his summer of recuperation and rejuvenation. Kwesi is a social commentator, news junkie, and professor of communication, based in the San Francisco Bay Area. Most recently, he launched a podcast called Telling Tall Stories.